The LIVE Programming Workshop invites submissions of new ideas for improving the immediacy, usability, and learnability of programming. Live programming gives the programmer immediate feedback on the behavior of a program as it is edited, replacing the edit compile-debug cycle with a fluid programming experience. The best-known example of live programming is the spreadsheet. The LIVE workshop is a forum for research on live programming as well as work on fundamentally improving the usability of programming, whether through language design or assistive environments and tools. This year we are reaching out to the CS Education community to include ideas on making programming more learnable and teachable.

The shared spirit of LIVE is a focus on the human experience of programming and an interest in reconsidering traditional practices and beliefs. Our goal is to provide a forum for early-stage work to receive constructive criticism. We accept short papers, web essays with embedded videos, and demo videos. There will also be a session dedicated to setting the agenda for this emerging area of research.

Our keynote speaker will be Chris Granger on “Against The Current: What We Learned From Eve”. The keynote will be open to all SPLASH attendees.

Tue 6 Nov

live-2018-papers
08:30 - 10:00: LIVE 2018 - Session #1 at Beacon Hill
live-2018-papers154148940000008:30 - 09:30
Talk
live-2018-papers154149300000009:30 - 10:00
Talk
Ragnar MogkTechnische Universität Darmstadt, Pascal WeisenburgerTechnische Universität Darmstadt, Julian HaasTechnische Universität Darmstadt, David RichterTechnische Universität Darmstadt, Guido SalvaneschiTU Darmstadt, Mira MeziniTU Darmstadt
Pre-print
live-2018-papers
10:30 - 12:00: LIVE 2018 - Session #2 at Beacon Hill
live-2018-papers154149660000010:30 - 11:00
Talk
Pre-print
live-2018-papers154149840000011:00 - 11:30
Talk
live-2018-papers154150020000011:30 - 12:00
Talk
Charles RobertsWorcester Polytechnic Institute
live-2018-papers
13:30 - 15:00: LIVE 2018 - Session #3 at Beacon Hill
live-2018-papers154150740000013:30 - 14:00
Talk
Media Attached
live-2018-papers154150920000014:00 - 14:30
Talk
Cyrus OmarUniversity of Chicago, Ian VoyseyCarnegie Mellon University, Matthew HammerUniversity of Colorado, Boulder, Ravi ChughUniversity of Chicago
Pre-print
live-2018-papers154151100000014:30 - 15:00
Talk
Glen ChiacchieriIndependent Researcher
live-2018-papers
15:30 - 17:00: LIVE 2018 - Session #4 at Beacon Hill
live-2018-papers154151460000015:30 - 16:00
Talk
live-2018-papers154151640000016:00 - 16:30
Talk
Brian HempelUniversity of Chicago, Ravi ChughUniversity of Chicago
live-2018-papers154151820000016:30 - 17:00
Talk
Ken PerlinNew York University, Zhenyi HeNew York University, Karl RosenbergNew York University

Call for Submissions

The LIVE’18 workshop invites submissions of new ideas for improving the immediacy, usability, and learnability of programming. Live programming gives the programmer immediate feedback on the behavior of a program as it is edited, replacing the edit-compile-debug cycle with a fluid programming experience. The best-known example of live programming is the spreadsheet. The LIVE workshop is a forum for research on live programming as well as work on fundamentally improving the usability of programming, whether through language design or assistive environments and tools. This year we are reaching out to the CS Education community to include ideas on making programming more learnable and teachable.

The shared spirit of LIVE is a focus on the human experience of programming, and an interest in reconsidering traditional practices and beliefs. Topics of interest include:

  • Live programming environments.
  • Visual/Projectional programming environments.
  • Advances in REPLs/notebooks/playgrounds.
  • Programming by example/demonstration.
  • Advanced debugging and execution visualization techniques.
  • Language learning environments.
  • Language design for learnability and teachability.
  • Alternative language semantics/paradigms in support of the above.
  • Suggestive experiments and experience reports on teaching programming.

Our goal is to provide a forum where early-stage work receives constructive criticism. We accept short papers, web essays with embedded videos, and demo videos. All submissions, including videos, should be prepared for blind review, and should include a 250-word written abstract. A reviewer should be able to study and evaluate your submission in about 45 minutes. Videos should be up to 20 minutes long and papers should be up to 6 pages long. We strongly recommend that your submission use concrete examples to explain your ideas. Submissions are due on Friday August 17. Notifications of acceptance will be sent by Friday September 7.